Publications

Linguistic and Cultural Innovation in Schools

This book presents case studies of five schools engaged in radical change in order to engage with children’s home languages and cultures in a more multilingual and inclusive way. While the schools in question are each anchored in a unique context and situation, they also have a common mission to see language diversity as a resource, and a responsibility to embrace all the languages of their pupils. The authors offer a rich resource for education professionals and policymakers, including not only theoretical insights but useful practical tips. This innovative volume will be a helpful resource for educational professionals interested in following a path of multilingualism as well as students and scholars of second language acquisition, heritage languages and cultures and multilingual educational policy.

Journal & Magazine Articles

Chalmers, H, & Crisfield, E. (March 2019). Drawing on linguistic and cultural capital to create positive learning cultures for EAL learners. Impact: The magazine of the Chartered College of Teachers

Crisfield, E., Holland, A, & Gordon, I. (Forthcoming 2019). Translanguaging as a pathway to ethical bilingual education. In At the Crossroads of EMI and Translanguaging: Global Perspectives

Crisfield, E. (2018). How can Euro-CLIL inform EAL Practice? EAL Journal, Summer 2018, p.28-29.

 

Crisfield, E. (2018). Challenging the Monolingual Habitus of International School Classrooms. International Schools Journal: John Catt Educational Ltd.

 

Crisfield, E. (2017). Every teacher is (not) a language teacher. International School Magazine, p. 5-8

 

Crisfield, E. (2016). Do we need to change our approach to mother tongue?, International School Magazine, p.11-13

Crisfield Burr, E. (2012). Motivation Research and SLA: Bringing it into the classroom. in Pawlak, M. (ed.). 2012. New perspectives on individual differences in language learning and teaching. 217-232. Berlin: Springer-Verlag

Recommended Resources

This is the gold standard for helpful books for schools and families. Baker has a clear and concise writing style that manages to convey complex, research-based information in 1-2 pages answers for each of your questions. The range of topics covered is exhaustive and many have links to further reading. The short-answer format also means it's easy to share a critical question and answer with colleagues, administrators, or parents.

This book is so popular that it is now in its sixth edition. If you enjoyed A Parents' and Teachers' Guide but are looking for something more substantive and in-depth, this is the book for you. It is essentially an undergraduate course on bilingualism in one text, and gives teachers (and leadership!) a strong grounding in bilingual theory. I think this should be required reading for every teacher working in a language-diverse school!

Carder's classic book is getting on in years, but it's still a valuable starting point for schools that are in the early phases of building language provisions, and he makes a strong case for the structured support that an EAL/ESL departments provides in an era when many schools are trying to do away with formal EAL/ESL arrangements. For international schools, Carder speaks specifically to both the unique circumstances and the needs of international schools in terms of policy and practice for languages.

This is the second edition of Gibbons' much read book on scaffolding. Although there are many books written about scaffolding in education, this one stands out due to its clear focus on bilingual learners in mainstream classrooms. It is skill-based, so expect to see the "four skills" addressed as separate entities, although linked in planning. Gibbons' techniques work best if the whole school agrees to take them on board and plan consistently.

This complex volume is not a beginner-level text, but it's extremely useful for language and literacy specialists. In particular, it covers all permutations of language learning in schools, from students learning a new language through the curriculum to standard language teaching. It is divided by age (early, middle years, adolescents), and gives a comprehensive overview by age of normal language development, as well as difficulties in both first and subsequent language acquisition. It links closely to literacy development in school and offers some input on supportive strategies, although this is not the main focus of the book.

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